212 branches of NY Public Library, photographed [...]

Elizabeth Felicella, photographed these libraries “in long and short sentences,” with the wish that “that the branch buildings of New York City’s public libraries be understood and maintained as a collection.”

http://urbanomnibus.net/2014/11/reading-room-a-catalog-of-new-york-citys-branch-libraries/

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Posted on Categories Libraries

The history of information, as mapped by one man [...]

HistoryofInformation.com is designed to help you follow the development of information and media, and attitudes about them, from the beginning of records to the present.[…]Could there possibly be a better project for a confirmed generalist?

History of Information homepage

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Posted on Categories Information science

First NSF Digital Libraries awards (1994) tied to Google’s origins [...]

> In 1994 the National Science Foundation Digital Libraries InitiativeOffsite Link made its first six awards. One of the six initial awards, funded on September 1, 1994, was for The Stanford Integrated Digital Library ProjectOffsite Link, in which Larry Page and Sergey Brin participated.

History of Information article

America’s digital library of digital libraries [...]

IMLS Digital Collections & Content is a huge aggregation of digital content from many institutions that created digital libraries with US Institute of Museum & Library Services funding.

Brose IMLS DCC / DPLA content

eBooks were invented in 1971 as a noncommercial project [...]

Project Gutenberg was the first provider of free electronic books, or eBooks. Michael Hart, founder of Project Gutenberg, invented eBooks in 1971.

The mission of Project Gutenberg is simple:

To encourage the creation and distribution of eBooks.
This mission is, as much as possible, to encourage all those who are interested in making eBooks and helping to give them away.[

Project Gutenberg is powered by ideas, ideals, and by idealism.

Project Gutenberg is not powered by financial or political power.

From the Project Gutenberg website

LOCKSS = Lots of Copies Keep Stuff Safe [...]

How does a digital library work? LOCKSS is one way, started in 1998 based on the OAIS Reference Model (Open Archival Information System).

The LOCKSS Program is an open-source, library-led digital preservation system built on the principle that “lots of copies keep stuff safe.” The LOCKSS system is the first and only mechanism to apply the traditional purchase-and-own library model to electronic materials.

Preservation requires three actions: a publisher to give permission for the target content to be preserved; for a library to bring online a LOCKSS box that has authorized access to the content; and for that LOCKSS box to be registered with one of a number of associated LOCKSS Alliance networks.[…]

Specifically, a LOCKSS Box performs five main functions:
It ingests content from target websites using a web crawler similar to those used by search engines.
It preserves content by continually comparing the content it has collected with the same content collected by other LOCKSS Boxes, and repairing any differences.
It delivers authoritative content to readers by acting as a web proxy, cache or via Metadata resolvers when the publisher’s website is not available.
It provides management through a web interface that allows librarians to select new content for preservation, monitor the content being preserved and control access to the preserved content.
It dynamically migrates content to new formats as needed for display [on-the-fly].

LOCKSS Website at Stanford